Caregivers

Hiring Help in the Home

Assess your needs

Do you simply need help with such daily activities as bathing, dressing and preparing meals? Or do you need medical or skilled nursing care as well? What resources do you have available to pay for such assistance?

Ask a lot of questions

Does the agency screen and train caregivers? Do caregivers undergo a criminal background check? (A certified home health aide, for example, must pass such scrutiny and cannot have certain convictions.) Does the agency handle all of the taxes and insurance? Are the agency and worker both bonded? Will Medicare, ALTCS or your private insurance cover any of the costs?

Find out your responsibilities

What taxes will you be required to pay if you hire the worker on your own?

Seek referrals from a trustworthy source

Avoid using a "help wanted" ad to hire a caregiver. You do not know the background—or motives—of those who respond. Be wary of ads seeking employment for an individual caregiver for the same reason. For lists of home care agencies and home health care agencies, contact your local Area Agency on Aging.

Consider taking some additional precautions if you do hire someone. It might be wise, for example, to move your valuables to another location for safekeeping—or at least lock them up. Unfortunately, seniors have lost many precious belongings to dishonest caregivers.

 

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This website has been prepared for general information purposes only. The information on this website is not legal advice. Legal advice is dependent upon the specific circumstances of each situation. Also, the law may vary from state-to-state or county-to-county, so that some information in this website may not be correct for your situation. Finally, the information contained on this website is not guaranteed to be up to date. Therefore, the information contained in this website cannot replace the advice of competent legal counsel licensed in your jurisdiction.

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